Featured Essays

A Taste of Honey

Malcolm Marchman, January 17, 2014

They say that a taste of honey is worse than none at all. Let me explain.  As a child, I was a voracious reader. I imagined myself sitting among the founding fathers as they risked their lives debating the single words that would comprise the Declaration of Independence. I also had the privilege of watching the life of Dr. Martin Luther King on a grainy black and white television in the 1960's. The collective acts of these valiant people cemented my love for equality and freedom. The 'honey' was the emotion that comes from watching true bravery in action. Little did I know that bravery and that which produces a person to exhibit it is a constant battle.  Little did I know that bravery is taken on daily by the famous and the unknown people that comprise this great, great country.

Dr. King knew secretly, that his efforts would expose freedom to those who did not understand what opportunity it actually was. To me as a young black kid, it was a singular freedom for "my people". I was young, straight, male, non-Jewish, well-fed, unmolested, a natural born citizen, and had no physical or mental handicaps. The hopes and dreams of the non-included citizen were not my concern or understanding. As I reread the equation of democracy, I came to understand, that "no man is free, unless all are free.”

Freedom rings in education. Education promotes morality. Morality promotes and sustains economic success. These are not my conclusions. They can be honed from the letters Dr. King wrote in his jail cell in Birmingham, Alabama. They can be honed from the brave words of those sitting in a cold room in Philadelphia. I suspect that in the future this same equation will be proven by the young students that I sit among at this mountainside college. Dr. King would probably have to hold back his tears as I have. Through those tears he would see the success of a freed diversity as well as realize the future struggle that this honey implies in the world to come.

I have gained immensely from such a profound legacy....and continue to use honey in my diet.

Malcolm Marchman

PPCC student and winner of the MLK Writing Contest

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