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Pharmacy Technicians in the workplace

Pharmacy technicians work in a variety of settings, to include hospitals, retail pharmacies, home healthcare, compounding pharmacies and insurance companies. They assist the pharmacist by performing sterile compounding and making IV medications; mixing, measuring and packaging medications to be dispensed; organizing drug inventory; billing for pharmacy services and performing authorizations for patients; answering calls and working as a liaison between the patient and their health providers; and managing customer service needs with utmost regard for patient safety. 

Pharmacy Technicians assist and support licensed pharmacists in providing health care and medications to patients. The pharmacy technician has broad knowledge and training in pharmacy, however does not require the advanced college education required of a licensed pharmacist. Pharmacy technicians specialize in the practical duties, allowing the pharmacist to focus on the judgemental tasks involved in patient education, pharmaceutical care and medication management.

Whether you choose the AAS Degree Program or Certificate Program, all courses are led by instructors with experience in the healthcare field. You’ll receive a quality education and personalized attention from faculty and staff who are dedicated to supporting your potential and preparing you for career opportunities as a professional pharmacy technician.

 

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Employment Projections

Hourly wages for pharmacy technicians can very greatly depending on the work site.

Retail chain stores, retail independent stores and long-term care pharmacies tend to have lower wages. Hospitals, home health care agencies, pharmacy software companies and pharmaceutical manufacturers tend to have higher wages.

Recent Statistics:

Average hourly wage: $15.26 (approximately $31,750 annual)
(from the Bureau of Labor Statistics).

Pharmacy Technician 
National  $31,750
Colorado $36,250

“It’s enviable. Today’s pharmacy students have virtually unlimited opportunities,” says Lucinda Moore of the American Pharmaceutical Association. (Source: “Big Dose of Openings: Pharmacists Wanted” CNN.com 12/18/2000)